RSS

Category Archives: Crimes against children

If I’m Found, by Terri Blackstock 

You know that point when you get to almost the end of a book and you must keep turning pages at the speed of an airplane? That’s this book. Actually, it’s this series. (Please read If I Run before this one. While some things wrap up at the end of the individual books, you’ll miss out on the heart of the main story, because it goes way beyond these individual titles.)

If I’m Found follows Casey’s continuing flight for her life after being accused of murdering her friend. It finds her where the first book has left her… wondering where she can go that she’ll be safe for a little while. 

One of the discussion questions Terri Blackstock has included at the back of this book is, “What is the key thing about this book that will stay with you?” Discussion questions in books are kind of a hit or miss thing for me, but I really appreciated this one. The key thing that will stay with me from this book? Its emphasis on light. In the midst of so much darkness, it would be easy for Casey to focus on that, to only see the darkness of the evil surrounding her. But she sees a glimmer of light every now and then, a little reminder that she can still have hope. She is trying so desperately to embrace the fact that, though evil may put up a good facade and it may be spreading its lies, it will not win. Not in the end. 

I really contemplated what food could correlate with this book, and.. you know those energy cookie bites that are all over pinterest? Yeah.. that’s what I have to go with. This is such an energetic book. So fast-paced that sometimes you’re not sure you’re actually sitting still.

 

Tags: , , , ,

Every Crooked Path, by Steven James 

*Please make sure to read this post to the end.

Stunned. That’s what this book did to me. It stunned me. And it made my heart ache.

Every Crooked Path is the most difficult Steven James book I’ve read. Judging from the author’s note in the first pages, it’s also the hardest one he’s ever written. The fact that it is an almost 600-page book dealing with crimes involving child predators makes it naturally very hard to read, and yet Steven James said that while he had an incredibly hard time writing it, he knew it needed to be written. And honestly, it needs to be read. We live in a world filled with increasing evil, and it’s just all too easy to ignore that in favor of living in bliss. But it doesn’t work that way.

As Edmund Burke said, “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

And that, I believe, is why this book needed to be written and why it needs to be read. We just can’t afford to ignore the evil surrounding us. This world cannot survive us living in blindness to evil.

Every Crooked Path tells the story of FBI Special Agent Patrick Bowers as he’s on the path of child abductors, molesters, killers. It seems that the more he discovers in this case, the less he actually knows… because things keep getting more complex. Trusting people becomes a deadly risk.

On a lighter note, Patrick spends his free time getting to know Christie and her daughter, Tessa… which I really liked. It added another dimension to this story that I hadn’t realized was coming, as (prior to beginning reading) I had thought this book was chronologically taking place closer to the time Opening Moves ended.

Having pondered for the past several days, I’ve decided to compare this one with vegetables being eaten by a child. The stereotypical picture. They don’t want to eat their vegetables… and yet they need to.

There was one word in this book that I didn’t expect to find in a Steven James book; I think it’s a reflection of how intense this kind of crime is, how it rips at our hearts and tears up everything inside us knowing that this stuff is happening. 

Honestly, this is a very good book; it’s just difficult to read. If you have any questions, feel free to ask me.