RSS

Category Archives: Forgiveness

Can’t Help Falling, by Kara Isaac

This book was truly a delight, and honestly, I dragged my feet at the end because I didn’t want the story to be over. 

Can’t Help Falling… what a perfectly chosen title for this darling story that opens with the heroine quite literally falling out of a wardrobe.. and into the arms of the hero. While I say this book is darling, I have to add a disclaimer… it *is* a very sweet story.. but there are some very difficult subjects that come up within these pages. It’s all about hope vs hopelessness, second chances, and forgiveness in every form. It’s about redemption. 

The difficulties encountered and fought through make this book that much sweeter. 

Why? Because it’s real. Not as in a true story, but real as in real life. We all make bad choices, and yet God cares about each of us so personally that He goes to great lengths to draw us to Himself… sometimes we just don’t want to see it. 

A quick synopsis.. Emelia and Peter could quote Narnia together for weeks on end. Neither has ever met anyone remotely like the other, and they are so drawn to each other. But each of them has guilt that they just cannot forgive themselves for, and neither do they really know how to let God forgive them either. They each blame themselves for someone’s too-soon death, and their regrets could very easily come between them when the whole truth comes out. 

Kara Isaac is an incredibly talented, creative writer, and her books are refreshing to me. 

I was thinking about likening this book to Turkish delight, since it is all about two people who might as well be Pevensies. But I’ve never actually had Turkish delight. So I am opting for chocolate. Chocolate with toffee bits in it, because it needs some crunch. 

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 9, 2017 in Fiction, Forgiveness, Friendship, Kara Isaac, Romance

 

Tags: , , , , ,

High as the Heavens, by Kate Breslin 

The tension of living in war-torn Belgium and France is very well-captured in this book. A World War 1 story, it covers an era that I don’t know nearly as well as WW2.

High as the Heavens tells us of Eve, a young woman who finds herself in Brussels, caught up in more levels of intrigue and deceit than she even realizes. Due to guilt she carries around with her through each moment of her present life, Eve believes herself unlovable and unforgivable.

Eve unexpectedly recognizes a victim in a plane crash, and the resulting danger in which she finds herself carries Eve and those close to her into some very dark places. This book is a beautiful picture of the hope that can only be found in Jesus. I love how Eve’s heart battle for hope and faith is so very real on these pages. It’s something that’s been difficult for me to read over the course of this summer (resulting in this book taking me much longer to read than it normally would) but so so necessary because of the beautiful hope that is reinforced.

I honestly can’t speak highly enough of Kate Breslin’s work – she may only have three novels in print thus far, but each of these three books is truly a story that will draw you in and make you forget that you’re not right there, going about everyday life with these beloved characters.

I would classify this book as a spicy chai, because of the deeply rich layers of flavor. Please read this book.

I was honored to be on the launch team for this book and received a copy in exchange for my honest review.

 
 

Tags: , , , ,

The Illusionist’s Apprentice, by Kristy Cambron

This Jazz Age story sparkling with enchanting descriptions and believable characters makes my heart smile. 

The Illusionist’s Apprentice has many dark places… but at each turn and shadow, there lives the promise of light and the reminder that darkness and evil cannot win. In spite of brushes with death and hatred, main characters Wren and Elliott are determined to keep a hold on hope.

Rooted in history, well-researched truth mingles with fiction. Though the majority of the book takes place in the late 1920s, there are flashbacks of sorts throughout, giving us as readers bits of backstory. I at first thought I wanted more of that background early on… but as I really delved into the heart of the story, I changed my mind. Each look back gives a very timely peek into Wren’s locked-tight past, each glimpsing a little deeper than we’d seen before — until we really understand this complex young woman who is as adept an illusionist off the stage as she is on it. 

Kristy Cambron did an excellent job with this latest release, and I very much recommend it. 

I want to compare this one to vanilla bean scones. There is much assuredness of hand-in-hand in this book, of “I’ll be right here no matter what”, and of hope anchored in the midst of life’s storms… and there is such comfort in that. Vanilla bean scones just seem to speak of that kind of familiarity and constantness to me that I found in these pages, so they seem to fit well. 

 

Tags: , , , ,

The Golden Braid, by Melanie Dickerson 

Simply put, I loved this book. It made me smile, and it engaged both my imagination and my heart.

The Golden Braid, as one might guess, tells the story of Rapunzel. It’s a story for every girl (no matter her age) who has ever dreamt of being a princess… for each one who has ever pretended she lived in a castle and wore twirly dresses to the ball.

As a young woman, Rapunzel has grown up always being taught to be wary of anyone and everyone, particularly men. While her soft heart is lonely and discontent because deep inside she desperately wants more, she feels a fierce loyalty to her adoptive mother. One day Rapunzel discovers a way to feed her hunger for knowledge by fulfilling one of her lifelong dreams — learning to read. An unexpected series of events finds Rapunzel in situations she wouldn’t have ever imagined, and she begins to learn what it means to learn what it means to love like Jesus.

Melanie Dickerson enchanted me as a reader with this reimagining of Rapunzel’s story. I’m enchanted like I am by chocolate cake. Rich in texture and flavor, chocolate cake and The Golden Braid make me want to eat dessert first.. and to read before anything else.

*This is actually the sixth book in a series… which I realized about 2/3 of the way through it. If you, like me, accidentally read them out of order, it’s not the end of the world. If you want to get the most out of the story though, you should probably go in order. That being said, this story is complete and can stand alone, as can all the others.